House for Hermes

House for Hermes - Andrew Simpson Architects in collaboration with Charles Anderson, photography by  Peter Bennetts House for Hermes - Andrew Simpson Architects in collaboration with Charles Anderson, photography by  Peter Bennetts House for Hermes - Andrew Simpson Architects in collaboration with Charles Anderson, photography by  Peter Bennetts House for Hermes - Andrew Simpson Architects in collaboration with Charles Anderson, photography by  Peter BennettsPhotography by Peter Bennetts
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I seriously stalked these images for you guys!
I spotted Andrew Simpson Architects on instagram…had a wander… smacked the table in delight when I saw the project above and promptly sent an email to find out more!

The House of Hermes is the result of a collaboration between Melbourne based; Andrew Simpson Architects with landscape architect and client; Charles Anderson.
My reaction to this place is that it really stuck out as something truly original! Its clever and interesting without being over designed and I love the exterior totally as much as the insides. Something that doesn’t often happen for me!
You can see much more of the house here and these are some words from the creators themselves:

“Divided into two primary volumes, the nucleus of the house is a reconfigurable kitchen in which the joinery works as the connective threshold between ground and first floor. This area is designed to accommodate a range of activities from group cooking classes to an intimate meal.  

The kiln is one of three buildings set within a large coastal property adjacent to protected wetlands. The Coldon home (a guest house and artist studio) and Setters Cottage (sewing studio) provide complementary amenities to the main house and along with an outdoor bathroom precipitate an engagement and traversal of the surrounding gardens and landscape.

The original heritage building is one of the few example of early 20th century chickory kilns on the Island constructed from concrete. Substantial rebuilding and restoration work to the concrete was required due to significant structural cracking and spalling, which was undertaken through the use of insitu reinforced shotcrete. The decking on the north side of the kiln is integrated with a large concrete retaining wall and water trough that was originally built as part of the industrial function of the building and has now been tanked and refilled with water to provide a means of passive cooling.

The project was delivered on a tight budget. Including the external deck areas the final building cost came in under $3000/m²”.

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One Response to House for Hermes

  1. Stunning home! The timber is absolutely beautiful

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